Fasting

Articles

Chrononutrition: Consistent Eating Patterns, Caffeine, and Principles for Better Health (Part 3 with Podcast)

In Parts 1 and 2 of this series, we set the stage for this post by exploring some important roles of diet in circadian system function and metabolic health. We focused in particular on diet timing.

In this final installment, I’ll first touch briefly on the importance of consuming foods and drinks at consistent times from one day to the next. Next, we’ll consider some commonly consumed dietary compounds that influence the circadian system. Then, I’ll leave you with some key takeaways that you can immediately put to practice in your pursuit of better health.

Finally – if you would like to learn even more about the topics addressed here – Dan, Jeff Rothschild, and I did a podcast together discussing aspects of chrononutrition, which you will find at the end of this article. 


Chrononutrition: Shortened Eating Windows, Breakfast-skipping, Eating Late, and More (Part 2)

In the first part of this series, we looked at how the circadian system times our daily patterns of behavior and physiology, and how the circadian system is synchronized with the 24 hour day. We discussed how the foods we eat, and the types and amounts of nutrients available, are key to synchronizing the ‘clocks’ in many of our bodies’ tissues.

Today, we will delve deeper into this subject, exploring the many ways that when we eat influences our metabolic health. Click to learn more!


Lifestyle Modifications to Extend Life by Limiting Growth

Does the ideal diet change across the lifespan? I couldn’t help circling back to this idea regularly while writing this article. In the last article on this subject of growth promotion and better aging, we discussed the concept of antagonistic pleotropy, which suggests that natural selection may favor genes that increase reproductive potential – even at the expense of long-term vitality and longevity. But can we harness an understanding of this idea to alter how we live in our post-reproductive window, to stay younger and live longer? In my latest post, I address just that – lifestyle modifications that may not only be effective to help us surviving longer, but also to live better along the way.


Get a 10-15% Increase in Lifespan from This Easter Island Substance?

In 1972, a compound was identified from a bacterial species (Streptomyces hygroscopicus) originally found off the coast of Chile on Easter Island. The compound was developed to prevent fungal infections but later was found to do other things like suppressing the immune system. In fact, a primary use for it currently is to prevent organ rejection in transplant patients. It’s possible, however, that its primary use may change in not-too-distant future to something very different due to another feature: This compound also limits cell division (antiproliferation effects) and promotes an intracellular clean up process, immediately raising interest in the field of aging sciences.

The compound is called rapamycin. All of its effects listed above happen through the suppression of a biochemical pathway that it’s named after – the “mechanistic target of rapamycin”, or mTOR for short. Let’s first discuss the mTOR pathway, why it’s so important for aging, and then we’ll take a closer look at the anti-aging properties observed with the compound rapamycin. We’ll also discuss whether this is something you can benefit from now.


Does Protein Restriction and Fasting Slow the Aging Process? Better Aging Part 3

In the previous article on aging, we looked at three forms of dietary restriction: caloric restriction, prolonged fasting, and alternate-day fasting. These interventions have played an important role in providing a framework for researchers to begin unraveling the molecular details of how aging happens. But these dietary restrictions are quite extreme and are simply not practical for everyone. In this article, we will look at two less extreme forms of dietary restriction: protein restriction, and the Daniel fast.