Stress

Articles

Sauna Bathing for Brain and Heart Health (Guest Jari Laukkanen, MD, PhD)

Taking a hot sauna regularly can feel good and relax you, but can it also prevent heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease?

If you’re from the US, you probably associate saunas with gyms and spas. But saunas have existed in some form for hundreds of years, particularly in Scandinavia, where they are used regularly as part of the culture. Nowhere are they more ubiquitous than in Finland – it is estimated that 99% of Finns use one at least once per week. They have traditionally been used as places to relax with friends and family and to recover from intense physical activity.

And while sauna usage is typically associated with health behaviors, like for example using a sauna after exercise or before sleep as a way to relax, research has now taken a closer look to see if sauna usage itself is health promoting.

In the newest episode of humanOS Radio, I talk with Jari Laukkanen, MD, Ph.D. Jari is a clinical cardiologist who runs a research lab at the University of Eastern Finland. He primarily studies the role of a wide range of cardiometabolic risk factors in relation to cardiovascular disease. In his latest study, he and his colleagues examined thousands of Finnish men over the course of two decades. Participants were divided into groups based on how frequently they sauna. It turns out that men who sauna more frequently appear to have a tremendous benefit to their heart and brain health. Listen here to learn more.


Deeper Sleep and Faster Sleep Onset with Virtual Reality and Neurostimulation?

Modern technology is messing with our sleep. But what if someone could develop a device that actually helped us fall asleep faster?

In the latest episode of humanOS radio, I talk with Kelly Roman. Kelly is a co-owner of Fisher Wallace Laboratories, a progressive medical device company that aspires to treat insomnia and depression in novel ways.

Fisher Wallace is introducing a neurostimulation product called Kortex to the market. This device non-invasively delivers a low dose of electrical stimulation, combined with a virtual reality headset that delivers relaxing VR content to the user.

And unlike reading on your phone, Kortex might actually *help* you to get to sleep faster, and experience deeper and more restorative sleep. Kortex stimulates the brain to produce serotonin and melatonin, while lowering cortisol – thus helping people manage stress and sleep without prescription drugs.

To learn more about this intriguing product, and the research leading up to it, please check out my interview with Kelly here.